The Ever Increasing Burden on America’s Public Schools 

This is one of the more fascinating looks into [some of] the plates classroom teachers are expected to spin all while ensuring every child is meeting national and state standards. For a PDF version, visit http://www.jamievollmer.com/pdf/the-list.pdf. “The contract between our communities and our schools has changed. It’s no longer “Help us teach our children.” It’s “Raise our kids.” No generation of teachers and administrators in history has had to fulfill this mandate. And each year, the pressure grows.” Jamie Vollmer Source: The Ever Increasing Burden on America’s Public Schools (Print Version) | Jamie Vollmer

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Nostesia

As previously mentioned, one of my heroes in education is businessman Jamie Vollmer, author of the book, Schools Cannot Do It Alone: Building Public Support for America’s Public Schools. He coined one of my favorite terms, “nostesia,” a combination of nostalgia and amnesia. Whether changing from conventional A – F grading system to standards-based grading or from a traditional calendar to one spread throughout the calendar year to prevent summer learning loss (or the “summer learning slide”), this term fights to defend and maintain the status quo. Nostesia Millions of Americans argue, often vehemently, that today’s schools are dreadful compared to the…

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The Blueberry Story by Jamie Vollmer

One of my heroes in education is Jamie Vollmer, author of the book, Schools Cannot Do It Alone: Building Public Support for America’s Public Schools. But Jamie is not an educator; he is a businessman. Yet the saga of his transition from a critic of public education to a supporter captures the issues facing public education in a profound way starting with his “blueberry” story. I urge you to visit his website, purchase his book, and read his detailed account of public education in America. It is one of the best reads on schooling you will find. The Blueberry Story:…

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Me: Won. Appendix: Zero

Note: This post was originally written July 5, 2015 and added to this blog site two years  later (because I have a blog now). The setting of my “how I spent my summer” essay would start at Denton Regional Hospital in wee hours of morning on Thursday in late June. Going back to the previous weekend where I’d been at the Texas Association of School Board Conference co-presenting some of the remarkable things happening in Denton ISD, I’d been hurting in the gut. But since internal issues have been my norm for so long, I just went on. (I chew Pepto-Bismol like…

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